Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Finis Yugoslavia

The Montenegrin declaration of independence on 3 June, (following the referendum on 21 May), and Serbia’s “me too” declaration of independence yesterday puts us a step closer to finis for Yugoslavia, (in its final form called “Serbia and Montenegro”), surely one of the bloodiest political experiments of modern times.

Born in oceans of blood, as a result of the First World War, which started with the murder of Archduke Franz-Ferdinand and his wife Sophie at Sarajevo in 1914 by the pro-Serbian terrorist Gavrilo Princip, it effectively ended as it began, in war, in Sarajevo, in the 1990’s. Only the details of Yugoslavia’s winding-up were left to work out, and Montenegro, its independence voided by Serbia in 1918, now rejoins the family of nations.

Only Kosovo is left, kept so far from independence by European reluctance to sanction secession. Final status talks on Kosovo are set to be concluded by the end of this year, and there seems little doubt that Kosovo will finally receive its freedom, and the misbegotten union of the South Slavs will finally receive its long overdue burial.

3 comments:

louielouie said...

what was the glue that held these "nations" together?
at least through my growing years.
was it the velvet glove or iron fist of marshall tito?
or simply the fear of the red army?
i.e., hungary part deux.
do as i say or they will come.
i can remember john chancellor(?) stating once that tito would be the only dictator that would be elected, if elections were held, behind the iron curtain. given the record of MSM, i wonder if that is believable?

El Jefe Maximo said...

The glue that held these nations together was during the Kingdom's days, the "Yugoslav" (i.e. Serbian) Army. Later, it was indeed Marshal Tito that kept Yugoslavia together, partly through reputation, partly through sitting on the Serbs. It was amazing the thing worked as long as it did.

I suppose Tito could have won a fair election in some places: others he'd have probably been gunned down. His power never, ever depended on ballots.

I confess upfront to not being a big fan of Marshal Tito's, or of the whole consolidated South-Slav project generally, so this comment needs to allow for my bias.

El Jefe Maximo said...

The glue that held these nations together was during the Kingdom's days, the "Yugoslav" (i.e. Serbian) Army. Later, it was indeed Marshal Tito that kept Yugoslavia together, partly through reputation, partly through sitting on the Serbs. It was amazing the thing worked as long as it did.

I suppose Tito could have won a fair election in some places: others he'd have probably been gunned down. His power never, ever depended on ballots.

I confess upfront to not being a big fan of Marshal Tito's, or of the whole consolidated South-Slav project generally, so this comment needs to allow for my bias.